One Would Think That Political candidates with a crime will fail the election. However, as studies show, this is not always what happens. More than just a third of the INDIA MPS Voted into office in 2014 had at least one Awaiting Legal case against them. What particular kinds of interactions were they accused To?

WERE THESE ALLEGATIONS KNOWN TO THE VOTERS?

The prevailing knowledge in the larger political economics literature says that voter ignorance is a major factor in why criminal or corrupt leaders win elections. Even those with extreme crimes sometimes win with number of crime records like Chris Watt. Which brings us to the question, where is nichol kessinger now? There are several grounds to believe that this is also true in India. Poverty and illiteracy are, after all, still common in contemporary India.

Although India has a lively media, its reach is still limited, particularly in rural and remote areas. Candidates have been forced to publicly reveal their criminal backgrounds, as well as their educational credentials and financial information, since 2003. However, it may be argued that most individuals do not have easy access to this information.

WHY DO THEY CHOOSE TO OVERLOOK THEM?

The book’s major premise is that voters have a strategic reason for supporting politicians with criminal backgrounds. Politicians may utilize their crime as a signal of their legitimacy when it comes to safeguarding constituents’ interests in situations when two criteria exist: a weak or unevenly implemented rule of law and extremely visible socioeconomic differences.

In other words, when social tensions are high and the state’s reputation is shaky, many people may seek shelter in the hands of a strongman who can fill in for the state’s numerous governance flaws in the service of his own social or ethnic group. This flips the classic “information asymmetry” argument on its head: information about politicians’ criminal records isn’t just obfuscated—crucial it’s to voters’ calculations.