The illegal bribery of authorities using money, commodities, or services in order to obtain an advantage is known as corruption.

Fraud, bribes, threats, extortion, and favoring relatives and friends are all examples of corruption (literally: corruption). For example, corruption is sometimes viewed as an essential economic resource since it allows the government to spend less money on civil servant salaries.

Bribery Using Money and Precious Materials Such as Jewelry

Because government salaries are so low in many nations, corruption is highly frequent and is considered more or less normal. Fines, for example, are frequently bought off the cops with a private settlement using money and jewelry. Sad thing is that any business such as Butterfly Jewelry, no longer has control over the commodity after purchase even if it will be used as a bribe. High-level corruption is more dangerous, and it is sometimes accompanied by human rights breaches; for example, to hide the acceptance of bribes, a government may use violence against journalists or trade union leaders.

The European Commission allows countries bordering Belarus to derogate from rules for the protection of asylum seekers.

International Corruption Ranking

Transparency International publishes an “index of perceived corruption” based on the experiences of businesspeople. According to 2016 data, countries like Denmark, New Zealand, Finland, Sweden, Switzerland, and Norway have exceptionally low levels of corruption. The countries with the most corruption include Somalia, South Sudan, North Korea, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, and Libya. Human rights are violated as a result of corruption. Because people spend a considerable portion of their money on bribes, kickbacks, and improper payments, corruption threatens living standards. Workers’ rights, such as the right to work, a fair wage, workplace protections, and safety, are all harmed by corruption. The rule of law, due process, and legitimate government initiatives are all harmed by corruption.

Legal Abuses

Because the legal system is likewise corrupt, when the judiciary punishes corruption, it frequently hurts innocent individuals. Those who expose corruption are frequently threatened or persecuted. Amnesty International has documented scores of countries where judges have been corrupted, causing them to convict innocent people while failing to prosecute those who are truly culpable (often in high positions).

Corruption in Bangladesh and Cambodia

Rana Plaza, a Bangladeshi businessman, was sentenced to three years in prison for corruption in August 2017. He was found guilty of hiding information regarding his income from an anti-corruption panel, according to the judge. Plana was the owner of a clothes firm that went bankrupt in 2013. As a result, hundreds of people died. The accident had nothing to do with Plana’s conviction. Cambodia is quickly deforesting, owing to deep-seated corruption, which causes trees to vanish at a breakneck pace. Many logging corporations have ties to senior military and government figures. This allows them to go into a primitive forest and cut down trees without being disturbed. Even natural places that have been designated as protected are not exempt. Customs officials at the Vietnam border ignore the timber export prohibition in exchange for bribes.